A Clockwork Orange

Wit, decadence, Brutalist architecture & Sir Kingsley Amis.

Zaroff

The general laughed with entire good nature. He regarded Rainsford quizzically. “I refuse to believe that so modern and civilized a young man as you seem to be harboring romantic ideas about the value of human life. Surely your experiences in the war—”
“Did not make me condone cold-blooded murder,” finished Rainsford stiffly.
Laughter shook the general. “How extraordinarily droll you are!” he said. “One does not expect nowadays to find a young man of the educated class, even in America, with such a naive, and, if I may say so, mid-Victorian point of view. It’s like finding a snuffbox in a limousine. Ah, well, doubtless you had Puritan ancestors. So many Americans appear to have had.

I can’t make it to your wedding, but I’m sure I’ll be at your wake.

—Modest Mouse, “Bukowski” (via judgemyname)

Carl Orff

—Carmina Burana (o fortuna)

m2compilation:

Carl Orff : Carmina Burana “O Fortuna” (1935)

Orff was born today (10/7) 1895

lanaanne14:

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther… . And then one fine morning—So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby

lanaanne14:

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther… . And then one fine morning—
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby

(via thegreatgatsbyquotes)

The sea lay like a great sheet of rippled blue glass in the sun. It was infinitely peaceful. In its cool depths a man would have no more fears, no doubts, no uncertainties. I could go down to the beach and into the water and swim out beyond the bay into the sea. I could go on swimming until my arms were too tired to bring me back to the land. My strokes would get slower, more labored. Then I would stop and sink. The water would rush into my lungs. I would struggle, the desire for life would surge up-life at any price!-but I should have made my preparations so that there would be no returning. There would be a moment or two of torment, then I should slide gently into oblivion.

—Eric Ambler, Epitaph for a Spy (via thebitterbite)

Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing.

—The Tower of the Elephant

mrkiki:

Santiago RusiñolErik Satie. 1890Óleo sobre tela. 85 x 67 cm

mrkiki:

Santiago Rusiñol
Erik Satie. 1890
Óleo sobre tela.
85 x 67 cm

de-es-ce-ha:

Sergiu Celibidache on his Philosophy of Music

nprmusic:

Composer, pianist and software engineer Stephen Malinowski has created one brilliant solution to an age-old problem: how to communicate and understand what’s going on in a piece of music, particularly if you don’t know standard musical notation. Over the course of some forty years, he’s developed what he calls the “Music Animation Machine,” and the results are stunning.

Bjork commissioned him to work on her Biophilia project, but now he’s tackled Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, just in time for the ballet’s 100th anniversary on May 29. 

Through this visualization, you can start to follow and understand the composer’s dazzlingly dense interplays of melody, instrumentation and the relationships between the instruments. 

via NPR Classical

aymerydelamaisonfort:

blastedheath:

Albert Marquet (French, 1875-1947), La gare Montparnasse sous la neige, 1913. Oil on canvas

Before they built the Tour Montparnasse… so different

aymerydelamaisonfort:

blastedheath:

Albert Marquet (French, 1875-1947), La gare Montparnasse sous la neige, 1913. Oil on canvas

Before they built the Tour Montparnasse… so different